Summaries- narrative from 2010 CDC Report


2010 - (US) - CDC - NISVS – Summaries – from original Report
http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/pdf/NISVS_Report2010-a.pdf
Prevalence of Rape, Physical Violence, and/or Stalking by an Intimate Partner
Prevalence Among Women
More than one-third of women in the United States (35.6% or approximately 42.4 million) have experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner at some point in their lifetime (Table 4.1). One in 3 women (32.9%) has expe­rienced physical violence by an intimate partner and nearly 1 in 10 (9.4%) has been raped by an intimate partner in her lifetime. Approximately 5.9%, or almost 7.0 million women in the United States, reported experiencing these forms of violence by an intimate partner in the 12 months prior to taking the survey. 

Nearly 3 in 10 women in the United States (28.8% or approximately 34.3 million) have experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner and reported at least one measured impact related to experiencing these or other forms of violent behavior in that relationship. The impact estimate is broader than the experience of rape, physical violence, and/or stalking because violent acts often do not occur in isolation and are frequently experienced in the context of other violence committed by the same perpetrator. More detailed informa­tion regarding the prevalence and distribution of IPV-related impacts is described in Section 5.

Prevalence Among Men
More than 1 in 4 men in the United States (28.5%) has experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner at some point in their lifetime. Most of the violence reported by men was physical violence; only 2.1% reported experiencing stalking by an intimate partner (Table 4.2). An estimated 1 in 20 men in the United States (5.0% or about 5.7 million) reported experiencing rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner in the 12 months prior to taking the survey.
About 1 in 10 men in the United States (9.9% or an estimated 11.2 million) has experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner and reported at least one measured impact related to these or other forms of violent behavior inthat relationship.
Prevalence Among Women
Approximately 4 out of every 10 non-Hispanic Black women, 4 out of every 10 American Indian or Alaska Native women (43.7% and 46.0%, respectively), and 1 in 2 multiracial non-Hispanic women (53.8%) have been the victim of rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime (Table 4.3). Among the other racial/ethnic groups of women, about one-third of White non-Hispanic women (34.6%), more than one-third of Hispanic women (37.1%), and about one-fifth of Asian or Pacific Islander non-Hispanic women (19.6%) in the United States reported that they have been the victim of rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime. 

Prevalence Among Men
Nearly half (45.3%) of American Indian or Alaska Native men and almost 4 out of every 10 Black and multiracial non-Hispanic men (38.6% and 39.3%, respectively) in the United States reported experi­encing rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner during their lifetime (Table 4.4). The estimated prevalence of these forms of violence by an intimate partner among Hispanic and White non-Hispanic men was 26.6% and 28.2%, respectively.

Overlap of Rape, Physical Violence, and Stalking in Lifetime Reports of Violence by an Intimate Partner
Among all women who experi­enced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime, 63.8% experienced one form of violence by an intimate partner; 56.8% experienced physical violence alone, 4.4% experienced rape alone, and 2.6% experienced stalking alone (Figure 4.1). Approximately 8.7% experi­enced rape and physical violence, 14.4% experienced physical violence and stalking, and 12.5% experienced all three forms of IPV.

Among all men who experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime, approximately 92% experienced physical violence alone, while 6.3% experienced both physical violence and stalking by an intimate partner (Figure 4.2). Too few men reported rape or other combinations of intimate partner violence to produce a reliable estimate.

Prevalence of Intimate Partner Rape, Physical Violence, and/or Stalking by Race/Ethnicity

Sexual Violence by an Intimate Partner
Prevalence Among Women
Nearly 1 out of 10 women in the United States (9.4% or approxi­mately 11.1 million) has been raped by an intimate partner in her lifetime (Table 4.5). More specifi­cally, 6.6% of women reported completed forced penetration by an intimate partner, 2.5% reported attempted forced penetration, and 3.4% reported alcohol/drug facilitated rape. Approximately 1 in 6 women (16.9% or nearly 19 million) has experienced sexual violence other than rape by an intimate partner in her lifetime; this includes sexual coercion (9.8%), unwanted sexual contact (6.4%) and non-contact unwanted sexual experiences (7.8%). 

In the 12 months prior to taking the survey, 0.6% or an estimated 686,000 women in the United States indicated that they were raped by an intimate partner, and 2.3% or an estimated 2.7 million women experi­enced other forms of sexual violence by an intimate partner.

Prevalence Among Men
Too few men reported rape by an intimate partner to produce reliable prevalence estimates. Approximately 1 in 12 men in the United States (8.0% or approxi­mately 9 million) has experienced sexual violence other than rape by an intimate partner in his lifetime (Table 4.6). This includes being made to penetrate an intimate partner (2.2%), sexual coercion (4.2%), unwanted sexual contact (2.6%) and non-contact unwanted sexual experiences (2.7%). In the 12 months prior to taking the survey, 2.5% or nearly 2.8 million men experienced sexual violence other than rape by an intimate partner.

Physical Violence by an Intimate Partner
Prevalence Among Women
Nearly 1 in 3 women (30.3%) in the United States has been slapped, pushed or shoved by an intimate partner at some point in her lifetime. This translates to approxi­mately 36.2 million women in the United States. An estimated 3.6%, or approximately 4.3 million women, reported experiencing these behav­iors in the 12 months prior to taking the survey (Table 4.7). 

Approximately 1 in 4 women in the United States (24.3%) has experienced severe physical violence by an intimate partner in her lifetime, translating to nearly 29 million women. An estimated 17.2% of women have been slammed against something by a partner, 14.2% have been hit with a fist or something hard, and 11.2% reported that they have been beaten by an intimate partner in their lifetime. An estimated 2.7%, or approximately 3.2 million women, reported experiencing severe physical violence by an intimate partner in the 12 months prior to taking the survey.

Prevalence Among Men
Approximately 1 in 4 men in the United States (25.7% or about 29 million) has been slapped, pushed or shoved by an intimate partner in his lifetime, and 4.5% or approxi­mately 5 million men, reported experiencing these behaviors in the 12 months prior to taking the survey (Table 4.8). 

Nearly 1 in 7 men in the United States (13.8% or approximately 15.6 million) has experienced severe physical violence by an intimate partner in his lifetime. About 9.4% of men have been hit with a fist or something hard by an intimate partner, 4.3% reported being kicked, and less than 3% reported each of the other forms of severe violence by an intimate partner in their lifetime. Two percent of men (approximately 2.3 million men) reported experiencing severe physical violence by an intimate partner in the 12 months prior to taking the survey. 

Stalking by an Intimate Partner
Approximately 1 in 10 women in the United States (10.7% or an estimated 12.7 million) has been stalked by an intimate partner in her lifetime, and 2.8% or about 3.3 million, reported being stalked by an intimate partner during the 12 months prior to taking the survey (data not shown). More than three-quarters of the women who reported being stalked by an intimate partner in their lifetime reported receiving unwanted phone calls or text messages (77.4%), nearly two-thirds (64.8%) reported that a current or former intimate partner showed up at their home, workplace or school when they didn’t want them to be there, and 37.4% reported being watched or followed by a current or former intimate partner.

Approximately 2.1% of men in the United States (2.4 million) were stalked by an intimate partner during their lifetime, and 0.5% (approximately 519,000 men) reported being stalked during the 12 months prior to taking the survey (data not shown). The most frequently reported stalking behaviors by an intimate partner were unwanted phone calls or text messages (83.7%); being approached or having a current or former intimate partner show up at their home, workplace or school when they didn’t want them to be there (52.1%), and being watched or followed by a current or former intimate partner (52.1%). 

Psychological Aggression by an Intimate Partner
Prevalence Among Women
Nearly half of all women in the United States (48.4% or approximately 57.6 million) have experienced at least one form of psychological aggression by an intimate partner during their lifetime, with 4 in 10 (40.3%) reporting some form of expres­sive aggression (e.g., their partner acted angry in a way that seemed dangerous, told them they were a loser or a failure, insulted or humiliated them), or some form of coercive control (41.1%) by an intimate partner (Table 4.9).
Nearly 1 in 7 women in the United States (13.9% or approximately 16.6 million) reported experiencing psychological aggression by an intimate partner in the 12 months prior to taking the survey. The prev­alence of expressive aggression or coercive control by an intimate partner in the 12 months prior to taking the survey was similar at 10.4% and 10.7%, respectively. 

Prevalence Among Men
Nearly half of men in the United States (48.8% or approximately 55.2 million) have experienced psycho­logical aggression by an intimate partner during their lifetime (Table 4.10). Approximately one-third (31.9%) experienced some form of expressive aggression and about 4 in 10 (42.5%) experienced coercive control. Nearly 1 in 5 men (18.1%) experienced at least one of these behaviors by an intimate partner in the 12 months prior to taking the survey; 9.3% experi­enced expressive aggression and 15.2% experienced coercive control. 

Psychologically Aggressive Behaviors Experienced by Female Victims
Among female victims of psycho­logical aggression, the most commonly reported behaviors were expressive forms of aggression such as being called names like ugly, fat, crazy, or stupid (64.3%), witnessing an intimate partner act angry in a way that seemed dangerous (57.9%), and being insulted, humiliated, or made fun of (58.0%) (Figure 4.3). Being kept track of by demanding to know her whereabouts (61.7%) was also a commonly reported behavior. 

Psychologically Aggressive Behaviors Experienced by Male Victims
Among male victims of psycho­logical aggression, the most commonly reported forms were: being kept track of by demanding to know his whereabouts (63.1%); being called names such as ugly, fat, crazy, or stupid (51.6%); being told he was a loser, a failure, or not good enough (42.4%); witnessing an intimate partner act angry in a way that seemed dangerous (40.4%); and being insulted, humiliated, or made fun of (39.4%) (Figure 4.4).


Prevalence of Control of Reproductive or Sexual Health by an Intimate Partner
Approximately 8.6% (or an estimated 10.3 million) of women in the United States reported ever having an intimate partner who tried to get them pregnant when they did not want to, or refused to use a condom, with 4.8% having had an intimate partner who tried to get them pregnant when they did not want to, and 6.7% having had an intimate partner who refused to wear a condom (data not shown). 

Approximately 10.4% (or an esti­mated 11.7 million) of men in the United States reported ever having an intimate partner who tried to get pregnant when they did not want to or tried to stop them from using birth control, with 8.7% having had an intimate partner who tried to get pregnant when they did not want to or tried to stop them from using birth control and 3.8% having had an intimate partner who refused to wear a condom (data not shown). 

Victim-Perpetrator Relationship in Lifetime Reports of Violence by an Intimate Partner
Approximately 86.1% of women and 83.6% of men who experi­enced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner during their lifetime reported that the perpetrator was a current intimate partner at the time when the violence first occurred, while less than a quarter (21.9% and 23.1%, respectively) experienced one of these forms of intimate partner violence by someone who was a former intimate partner at the time the violence first occurred (data not shown).
Number of Perpetrators in Lifetime Reports of Violence by an Intimate Partner
The majority of women (70.8%) who ever experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner reported being victimized by one partner, 20.9% were victimized by two partners and 8.3% were victimized by three or more partners. Similarly, the majority of men (73.1%) reported being victimized by one partner, 18.6% were victimized by two partners and 8.3% were victim­ized by three or more partners (data not shown).

Age at the Time of First IPV Experience among those who Experienced Rape, Physical Violence, and/or Stalking by an Intimate Partner
Among women who ever expe­rienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner, more than 1 in 5 women (22.4%) experienced some form of intimate partner violence for the first time between the ages of 11 and 17 years (Figure 4.5). Nearly half (47.1%) were between 18 and 24 years of age when they first experienced violence by an intimate partner. 

Among men who ever experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner, 15.0% experienced some form of IPV between the ages of 11 and 17 years (Figure 4.6). In addition, 38.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24 when they first experienced violence by an intimate partner.

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